Establishing Your Own Investment Criteria

Establishing Your Own Investment Criteria

This is an excerpt from Chapter 4, ‘Establishing Your Own Investment Criteria’, of Frazer’s upcoming book, The Alternative Guide To Property Investment. You can register your interest in pre-ordering the book by clicking on the button at the bottom of this post.

We held a dinner for our top-20 investors recently and I think it’s fair to say that just about everybody had different reasons for investing and slightly different criteria for choosing what to invest in.

Before investing any money, you need to consider what you want to achieve. Do you want to sit back and let your investment grow in value (e.g. stamps or wine or a pension fund, if you still think that’s a good idea) or do you want to generate an income (e.g. shares or property)?

Or perhaps a mix of the two?

Do you solely want to provide for your retirement and reinvest any income generated or do you need to earn an immediate income from your investments?

Are you prepared to risk all your capital on the same sort of investment or do you want to make some ultra-safe investments and speculate with a certain portion of your money on riskier but potentially more lucrative investments?

These are just a few of the questions you should ask yourself as the answers will help formulate your own investment criteria. If you have decided that you want to invest some of your capital into property, then the two most significant decisions you need to make are whether you want the emphasis to be on capital growth or cash flow and whether you want to make commercial or residential property investments.


To read more about establishing your own investment criteria, you can click below to register your interest in the book. Fill in your details, and once the book is released, we will send you more information.

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March Peer To Peer & Development Performance Stats

March 2017 Summary P2P & Development Stats

March 2017 summary and monthly statistics can be seen below.

Bridging Loans 31/03/2017
  Net
Total Amount Lent £14,971,670
Total Returns Paid £458,801
No of Loans 41
No of Loans Repaid 18
Average Loan Period 10
Investor Capital Lost 0%
Average Loan Size £364,658
Average Loan to Value 70%
Average Interest Rate Paid 8.94%

 

Development Loans 31/03/2017
  Net
Total Amount Lent £11,010,571
Total Returns Paid £146,212
No of Loans 16
No of Loans Repaid 5
Average Loan Period 10
Investor Capital Lost 0%
Average Loan Size £688,161
Average Loan to Value N/A
Average Interest Rate Paid 11.69%

You can find all our latest investments by clicking here.


View our Property Investments

Peer To Peer and Development Performance Stats

December 2016 Summary P2P & Development Stats

December 2016 Summary Monthly Statistics can be seen below.

Bridging Loans   31/12/2016
  Gross Net
Total Amount Lent £10,773,024 £9,624,670
Total Returns Paid £292,637 £292,637
No of Loans 28
No of Loans Repaid 14
Average Loan Period 10
Investors Capital Lost £0
Average Loan Size £384,751 £343,738
Average Loan to Value 70%
Average Interest Rate Paid 9.00%
Average Interest Rate Offered 9.08%

 

Development Loans   31/12/2016
  Gross Net
Total Amount Lent £8,865,861 £8,019,571
Total Returns Paid £46,862 £46,862
No of Loans 12
No of Loans Repaid 2
Average Loan Period 9
Investors Capital Lost £0
Average Loan Size £738,822 £668,298
Average Loan to Value N/A
Average Interest Rate Paid 14.00%
Average Interest Rate Offered 11.92%

You can find all our latest investments by clicking here.

View our Property Investments

Manchester Property Market Growth at 12 Year High

Manchester Property Market Growth at 12 Year High

Latest figures released by the Hometrack Index show Manchester property market growth to have hit a 12 year high in 2016. This gives the city the second highest rate of price growth in the UK, next to Bristol.

A rise of 8.9% year-on-year for Manchester was reported, with experts predicting that the city will overtake Bristol for pole position by the end of the first quarter of 2017. The figures for Manchester exceed the average year-on-year increase across the UK, which came in at 7.7%.

Strong market fundamentals, particularly a significant supply/demand imbalance in Manchester, keep pressure on prices high. Despite the same supply/demand imbalance in the capital however, London dropped to seventh place for price growth in 2016.

Strong Market Fundamentals Keep Manchester Property Market Growth Thriving

Manchester’s vibrant rental market is also thriving, with demand continuing to grow. This, of course, makes it a dream opportunity for buy-to-let investors. Indeed, the city was recently named the UK’s buy-to-let hotspot by HSBC. This is all despite the massive challenges faced by buy-to-let investors following the government’s attacks on landlords.

The growing popularity of property crowdfunding is helping prospective buy-to-let investors push back against these attacks, providing a welcome haven for those keen to benefit from a steady stream of secured rental income.

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Rental growth here is 13 times that of London, driven by the growing population of young renters, flocking to the city for studying and career opportunities. Manchester boasts 60% more 25-29 year olds than the UK average, placing it within the country’s fastest growing demand for short term lets.

Massive Investment In Manchester Fuelling Property Market Growth

Success is also compounded by the government’s whopping £7 billion investment in Manchester. Determination to develop a world-class infrastructure in the city will attract further billions of worldwide investment over the coming years, which is already evident as overseas investors hone in on the investment opportunities offered here.  

Over 100,000 students across Manchester’s four main higher education institutions give it the highest student population in Europe.

70,000 of these are not in student halls of residences, meaning they are renting privately within the city. This makes it prime territory for PBSA (Purpose Built Student Accommodation) investment.

Across the board, from the UK-leading purchase market, to the thriving private rental and student markets, right through to commercial investments, Manchester is winning. As growth in the city’s property market continues at an unprecedented pace, with huge investment fuelling projected growth for years to come, we remain confident in the continued promise that our city offers investors.

View our Property Investments

Our 2016 Summary

Our 2016 Summary

December saw another successful month for The House Crowd, which rounded the year off nicely for us and allowed us to start 2017 on the right foot. It was a very busy month, with 4 bridging loans being repaid, 1 property sold and seed capital repaid for one of our development projects. We paid out over £2.2 million in capital returned to 693 investors. You’ll find the stats, for December, as well as for our 2016 summary, below:

December 2016

Projects paid out against – 24

Total Value of dividends and interest paid – £195,747.96

Total Value of Capital Repaid – £2,057,295

Total paid out to investors for December – £2,253,042

Total number of investors paid – 693

2016 Final

Project paid out against – 240

Total value of dividends and interest paid – £794,126.60

Total Value of Capital Repaid – £4,554,720

Total number of investors paid – 5,506

Cumulative

Project paid out against – 434

Total value of dividends and interest paid – £1,135,625.00

Total Value of Capital Repaid – £5,005,720.00

Total number of investors paid – 8,498

We’re excited to see where 2017 takes us, and hope that you will join us for the ride. With many upcoming developments and exciting projects to invest in, we’re sure that 2017 is going to be a year to remember.

You can find all our latest investments by clicking here

 

An Introduction to Investing Through Property Crowdfunding

An Introduction to Investing Through Property Crowdfunding

Traditionally, only those with access to large amounts of capital have been able to invest in the lucrative world of property. Managing a portfolio is normally time-consuming, business, which becomes increasingly more burdensome as the investor’s portfolio becomes larger.

However, in the last few years, a new method of property investment has emerged which has effectively democratised the entire investment process, allowing more people than ever to benefit from the financial gains that property investment can offer.

Property crowdfunding started to take off in 2012, and is now worth billions of dollars a year worldwide. The value of the industry currently doubles every two months, and is set to be worth $250bn by 2020.

The growth of the property crowdfunding industry has been catalysed, in part, by the relaxation of regulations over the last few years. The Government has identified the industry as being hugely beneficial to the economy, and has also begun investing in crowdfunding itself. Institutional investment is also coming into play at an increasing rate, and high net worth investors, attracted by the simplicity of the process, and the returns available, are also investing through property crowdfunding.

But why is investing in property crowdfunding proving so popular?

Offering the chance to build a diverse portfolio without all the legwork involved in traditional property investment models, and with the opportunity for significant gains, it’s no surprise that investing in property crowdfunding has grown exponentially in the last few years.

What’s more, as interest rates on savings continue to crawl along the seabed, and returns from both rental and sales continue to rise, more and more people are waking up to crowdfunding as a simple way to grow their money.

How Does It Work?

Property crowdfunding encompasses both equity investments and debt based investment (also known as peer to peer secured lending).

The concept itself is relatively simple.

Equity investments involve a group of people pooling their cash to buy a property as shareholders through a ‘Special Purpose Vehicle’ (SPV). The SPV is a limited company, set up solely for the purchase of that property. The SPV handles all the work, fees and maintenance of the property, whilst the shareholders receive their proportion of the rental yields, and/or share of capital gains when the property is sold.

People can invest even very small sums in buying shares in the property. On some platforms, this is as low as £50, but the typical minimum is between £500 and £1000. One of the advantages of property crowdfunding is that you can spread your available capital over a number of different properties across the crowdfunding platform, to mitigate risk.

View our Property Investments

Getting started is a very quick and easy process. You simply register on your chosen website – it is an FCA requirement that only registered and accredited investors may participate, and, once registered, you simply select the properties you wish to invest in.

Debt based investments again involve pooling resources, in this instance, to make micro loans through the platform to a third party borrower. The loan as a whole is secured against the borrower’s property and the platform appoints an agent to act on behalf of lenders and take any necessary enforcement action. These types of investment are usually short term (up to 12 months, and pay a fixed rate of interest with no capital growth).

Where Did It Start?

The House Crowd is the longest-established property crowdfunding platform. It began trading in 2012 and offers both debt and equity investments. Since then, other companies have followed in their footsteps, such as Property Moose in 2013, and Property Partner and Crowdlords in 2014. The industry continues to expand, with several new platforms emerging each year.

Is It Regulated?

Property crowdfunding firms are all regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which ensures that platforms are managed properly, and that risks are made completely clear to investors. As with any investment, there is risk to capital – but it’s worth comparing this risk against other investment classes, and seeing how property crowdfunding stacks up.

Before investing through property crowdfunding platforms, it is very important to do your research. Every regulated platform should have the FCA authorisation number clearly visible on their website. If you can’t find these details, you should steer clear as they are not operating legally.

Is It The Right Choice For Me?

As with any investment, you need to take into account your personal circumstances to establish whether it is the right one for you.

You can find out more about establishing whether property crowdfunding is the right investment for you here.

Ask yourself what you wish to achieve. Investors with a lot of professional experience and access to bank funding, may find the model less appealing than novices.

If, on the other hand, you don’t have a deposit available, or aren’t able to get a mortgage, then investing through property crowdfunding could be an ideal way for you to access this asset class. And, given the government’s recent attacks on landlords, which has severely undermined the profitability and viability of buy-to-let investing for individual investors, it may well be that crowdfunding remains the only sensible option available for most.

Risk

The same principles that apply to other forms of property investment also apply to crowdfunding. You should be aware that capital growth profits are speculative, and investing in properties that produce a healthy cash flow is the more sensible approach.

One of the major risks associated with cash flow positive properties is that of damage or non-payment of rent. As such, you should always factor this in as an eventuality that may affect your yields. As mentioned above, however, if you have a well-diversified portfolio, with your capital spread over several properties, any losses due to one bad tenant will be more bearable than if you had all your eggs in one basket.

View our Property Investments

At the end of the day, it all comes down to your risk tolerance. You do lose a large amount of leverage by investing through property crowdfunding, and you will only benefit proportionately from the property’s capital growth but, at the same time, having no borrowing means significantly less risk as there are no mortgage payments and no danger of the property being repossessed (as shareholders own it outright).

If making crowdfunded debt-based investment, (aka peer to peer lending) you need to know what would happen if the borrower defaults and does not repay the loan. You should ask questions about how your investment would be protected, what happens in the event of a default – how easy is it to take control of the secured property? – and how much equity is available to enable you to recover your money should the worst happen. Unless there is sufficient equity in the property, you could risk losing some or all of your money.

If you opt for debt-based investments, your investment will be secured by a legal charge. A critical matter to consider is at what LTV the loan is made. If, for example, a loan is made at ‘75% LTV’, it means that you will be at risk of losing some of your capital if the borrower defaults, the property has to be seized, and is sold for less than 75% of its current valuation.

Debt investments are generally considered to be lower risk than equity investments, as lenders are always paid out before shareholders, however, you do not get the potential upside of capital growth.

What About If I Want Out of My Investment?

If you need a liquid asset, then property is not the best choice.

Investing through property crowdfunding facilitates liquidity to some degree as it may be easier to sell shares in a property than the whole property. However, there is never any guarantee that you will be able to find a buyer, and, if you cannot do so, you will have to wait until the property is sold.

Some platforms will help you to find a buyer after the expiry of a minimum term, but you should check the small print before you invest. If you’re looking for a short term investment, P2P secured lending may be the better option.

To Conclude

We hope that this has offered you some valuable insight into getting started investing through property crowdfunding. Of course, you should know everything about the ins and outs of any investment before you part with your money, and we are fully committed to helping you know all you need to.

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If you have any questions, you can always get in touch with us and we will be very happy to fill you in.

Property Crowdfunding: Is It The Right Investment For Me?

Property Crowdfunding: Is It The Right Investment For Me?

Property crowdfunding is becoming an ever-more popular way for people to invest in property, often with significantly less money than investing the traditional way. However, before you jump in, it’s a good idea to assess whether this is the right investment choice for you and your circumstances.

You can view our current property investment options here.

What Do You Want To Achieve?

The first question to ask yourself when considering property crowdfunding is what you wish to achieve from your investment.

If you are looking for an investment that requires less ongoing attention than owning a property for either development or rental, or you personally have more faith in the property market than the stock market, then it could be right for you. Nonetheless, plenty of investors in property welcome the sense of control that owning a property outright brings.

Though there is more additional financial outlay involved in the purchase and maintenance of a property owned this way, some people would rather be involved in all aspects of their investment than leave it to another party.

You can find out more by registering here.

What Experience in Property Investment Do You Have?

This follows on to the second question you need to ask. How experienced are you as a property investor?

If you’ve been a full-time, outright property investor for some time, and have access to the bank funding required to own and develop a property yourself, then property crowdfunding may be less appealing.

For those who know how the market works, and perhaps already have all the necessary contacts they need for the properties they invest in, benefitting from more of the profits (after paying off loans), as opposed to their share percentage, may be a more attractive investment option.

If none of this applies to you, then you could be the sort of person who would benefit from property crowdfunding, depending your circumstances.

What Are Your Circumstances?

For novice or less experienced investors, or those who have less access to bank funding, then property crowdfunding can offer an opportunity to invest in property that is unavailable through other means. For those who are interested in the prospect of weathering the risks of property investment, rather than earning scarcely any interest on their savings accounts, again, property crowdfunding may offer an alternative path.

Whenever you consider an investment, whichever form this may take, you need to ensure that you are covered in the event that the investment takes a turn for the worst. You should only ever invest what you can afford, so make sure your calculations are correct, and you won’t cause yourself financial harm if, for any reason, the value of your investment falls.

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To Conclude

As a final note, if you decide to invest in property crowdfunding, there is further investigation to be undertaken. You will need to choose the right crowdfunding platform. It is very important to do your research, and to only settle on the platform that meets all your needs and requirements. Make sure they are regulated by the FCA, that they have a good reputation, and that their customer service and complaints procedures meet your standards.

View our Property Investments

Entrusting your money with any investment vehicle is a decision that should never be made lightly. Ensuring that you are confident with all aspects of the investment is crucial, including the issue of risk. Property crowdfunding is no different to most other investment types, in that there is always a risk of loss. Knowing everything you can, and choosing the right investment for you, is the key to investing happily, smartly, and – hopefully – profitably.

 

Property Crowdfunding Investment or Buy to Let?

As the UK Government sweeps in with more and more tax changes on the buy-to-let sector, property crowdfunding investment becomes an increasingly attractive option.

Jeremy McGivern, founder of Mercury Homesearch, has stated that he thinks that property crowdfunding investment is likely to represent the biggest change within the housing market over the next few years.

However, along with his comments, McGivern issued a strong warning that the rise of property crowdfunding investment could have a ‘catastrophic’ outcome. Whilst the general consensus is that the rise of the property crowdfunding industry is a positive development, in that it democratises property investment, McGivern thinks that allowing a wide range of people to access the previously out-of-reach property market could lead to irresponsible investment, as people fail to understand the risks involved.

Lee Grandin, of peer-to-peer lending platform Lend2Landlord, surprisingly concurred: “Any mechanism such as a P2P platform that engages a funder that is not able to make a sound decision on whether to lend its money is a total disaster.”

He went on to make the point that “…risky investment should be limited by your net worth but Brexit clearly shows you can’t dictate what people should or shouldn’t do so that is unlikely to ever happen.

“There is only ever one message you can ever say and it must be said clearly and concisely: Your capital is at risk; you could lose all your money.”

But are they right about property crowdfunding investment?

Whilst Grandin and McGivern do have a point about the risks of getting into P2P lending or property crowdfunding investment without adequate understanding of the risks involved, we would argue that the vast majority of investors are intelligent and informed individuals.

In order to pass the registration process, at The House Crowd for example, prospective investors must pass a test. They must show they understand what property crowdfunding involves, as well as its risks, before they are allowed to continue. Furthermore, FCA regulation holds property crowdfunding platforms to strict controls that must be legally adhered to. Investors must be ‘clearly and concisely’ (as Grandin puts it) aware of the risks, and we aim to do this at every opportunity.

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Perhaps McGivern and Grandin underestimate investors in property crowdfunding. We certainly see a wide range of benefits to the property crowdfunding and P2P lending model. At a time when the buy-to-let market is increasingly strangled off, at the same time as the number of renters continues to grow, the model provides a much-needed solution.

Of course, being absolutely aware of the risks, and exploring all avenues for investment before deciding on property crowdfunding is vital. Investing money is a serious matter, and not one that most people take lightly. And nor should you.

We continue to be fully in favour of the democratising force of property crowdfunding, and the continued flow of movement it gives the property market. In the North West in particular, increasing levels of property crowdfunding go hand in hand with the wealth of regeneration that is building a bright future for the region. There continues to be a real problem with shortage of affordable homes, and property crowdfunding might just be one of the solutions to that.

View our Property Investments

The Latest Crowdfunding News – 6/10/16

The Latest Crowdfunding News

 

Hi guys and welcome to another crowdfunding news edition, as usual, we will be travelling around the UK and around the globe in order to give you a snapshot of the latest goings-on in the crowdfunding world. Today we start our round-up and focus on The FCA and Cambridge University partnership, both have teamed up to review the current state of alternative finance, to ending our round-up in China. Missed our previous blog round-ups? If so, catch up here.

 

FCA & Cambridge University Team Up to Review UK Alternative Finance

hands

The Financial Conduct Authority (The FCA) and the Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance (CCAF) have teamed up to assist in the review of the UK alternative finance industry. The joint project will inform the FCA’s ongoing post-implementation review of crowdfunding regulation which is currently in process.

There’s a consensus that the UK is a global leader when it comes to alternative finance regulation.

Moreover, The Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance is a global leader in research on disruptive finance. The pair will be working on a program of research that will identify any changes in the nature of the industry,clients’ expectations, plus its overall place in the financial services landscape.

The unique partnership will be primarily looking at what the crowdfunding investor population really looks like and how it is evolving, another research area that they will be investigating is how investors on the platforms understand the risks involved, as well as how they use the information provided to them by fundraisers. In addition, their research will look at the types of investments crowdfunding platforms are competing with for investors’ money, plus how these platforms and investors share the burden of due diligence and whether an expectation gap exists between the two.

 

Santander UK Strikes a Partnership With an Alternative Finance Company

Santander

Santander UK has struck a partnership with an alternative finance company to fund social enterprises in a deal that marks the first tie-up between a large British high-street bank and a crowdfunding site. (FT.com,October 2016)

The banking giant is joining forces with Crowdfunder to provide £200,000 to community projects, charities and enterprises that are focused on social change across the country.

The bank will donate half the funding target of a project once it raises 50 per cent from the public online.

This headline has gained attention because the partnership further closes the gap between mainstream and alternative finance, it also paves the way for closer collaboration between a well known high-street lender and the crowdfunding sector.

Back 2014, Santander UK paired up with Funding Circle referred small business customers looking for loans to the P2P lender when the bank was unable to serve them.

However, the deal with Crowdfunder is different because equity crowdfunding involves raising money from the public who each gain a share in the company.

Managing director of Santander Business Banking, Sue Douthwaite, told the FT : “Our purpose is to help people and businesses prosper and we recognise the important role social enterprises and charities play in helping communities to thrive.

“With the power of the crowd, our £200,000 Changemaker Fund will help bring great ideas to life and enable social enterprises and community ventures to grow.”

Image source : FT.com

Africa : Has Crowdfunding Potential but Regulatory Laws need to Catch Up

Africa Crowdfunding

Last year crowdfunding platforms in Africa raised $32.3 million for various projects, data from the Afrikstart Crowdfunding in Africa report reveals. However, that figure could be much higher over the coming years if governments across the continent developed crowdfunding regulations.

As Nigerian journalist Yomi Kazeem mentions in his article for QZ.com, despite its rising popularity, the most common limitation of crowdfunding across most African countries, is a lack of legal and regulatory framework.

The Afrikstart Crowdfunding in Africa report states : “The absence of regulation limits the expansion of equity-based or debt-based crowdfunding platforms in Africa.”

Therefore, having a lack of regulation in place is likely to deter investors from using online platforms as there is no investor protection in place.

However, despite having regulation limitations, with cost of access to internet dropping in parts of Africa and smartphone penetration deepening, on the plus side, more Africans are taking advantage of crowdfunding platforms to finance projects ranging from start-ups to social causes.

South Africa comes out on top when it comes to crowdfunding, The Rainbow Nation’s platforms have raised $30.8 million, it’s worth noting that $32.3 million was raised by crowdfunding platforms from all over Africa, so it just goes to show how well South Africa is championing the concept.

The country’s dominance in crowdfunding on the continent is not accidental. According to a report, the popularity of crowdfunding in South Africa is down to the country’s “sophisticated business market, a robust and reliable regulatory credit system and supervision.”

Although not 100% perfect, other African countries can learn a lot from South Africa and adopt a more robust crowdfunding strategy.

 

Restaurant Chain “M” Secures £1.2M Just Hours After Seedrs Campaign Debut

M Crowdfunding

Just hours after restaurant chain M launched its equity crowdfunding campaign on Seedrs, the London-based company has successfully secured £1.2 million out of its £1.3 million funding goal. (Crowdfund Insider, October 2016)

Since its launch back in 2014, the chain has received numerous awards such as : Best Use of Technology The Cateys 2016, Best Young Chef UK & Ireland 2016, San Pellegrino Awards, Best for Steak and Seafood, and many more.

For those that invested in the campaign, starting with the investors that put £10k into the campaign, they will receive 25% discount at M until January 2019, a copy of Executive Chef Michael Reid’s M: a 24- Hour Cookbook, free membership of M DEN, our luxury private members lounge plus, 15% off online wine purchases.

The investors that put in between £1,000 – £9,999 will receive a 15% discount at M until January 2019, a copy of Executive Chef Michael Reid’s M: a 24- Hour Cookbook and free membership of M DEN,  their luxury private members lounge.

Lastly, those who invested between £200- £999 get 0% discount at M until January 2019 and a copy of Executive Chef Michael Reid’s M: a 24- Hour Cookbook.

You can read more about the crowdfunding campaign here.

Image source : Crowdfund Insider

Crowdfunding The Great Wall of China

great wall of china crowdfunding

Heritage officials have launched a crowdfunding campaign to help pay for restoration work on the Great Wall of China.

China Radio International has reported that more than 16,000 people have donated online since the campaign started at the end of August, raising almost 300,000 yuan ($45,000; £34,000) so far (stats taken from last month).

Dong Yaohui, who’s in charge of the fundraising effort, mentioned on the BBC website : “By pooling the contribution of every single individual, however small it is, we will be able to form a great wall to protect the Great Wall.”

The funds made will go towards restoring the Xifengkou section, which runs through a reservoir, and all of the project spending will be made public.

 

What Are Your Thoughts?

 

Which of our chosen crowdfunding stories has interested you the most? We would love to hear from you, feel free to leave us a comment on our Facebook and Google Plus pages. If you prefer to tweet us, tweet @TheHouseCrowd.

In the meantime if you want to know more about Property Crowdfunding do register for our Information Pack which will tell you all about it.

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The Latest P2P News – 16/9/16

P2P News – All The Latest Updates

 

Hi guys and welcome to another P2P news round-up, as usual we will be giving you a snapshot of the latest goings-on in the P2P world. Today we look at an array of news items from there is no evidence of P2P investors underestimating risk to focusing on what the P2P and marketplace lending industry needs to do to go mainstream. Missed our last P2P news round-up? If so, catch up here.

No evidence of P2P Investors Underestimating Risk

P2P Lending

Last month, former FCA chief executive, Tracey McDermott, voiced concerns about the rapid growth of the P2P marketplace that could potentially leave some investors unaware of the risks.

However, the P2PFA’s (Peer-to-Peer Finance Association) director Robert Pettigrew, stressed that this was not the case.

Mr. Pettigrew recently mentioned that although approaches varied depending on the company, the P2PFA was dedicated to ensure investors were aware of all the risks involved.

In addition, he stated : “Different platforms have adopted a variety of approaches to ensure a high level of consumer understanding, but with continued grow and expansion in the sector, the focus on making sure that all investors have an awareness and understanding of the risks of peer-to-peer finance products will continue to be a major priority for P2PFA platforms.” (Bridging & Commercial, September 2016)

Platforms such as LendingCrowd and LandBay recommend that investors should require financial advice if they are unsure about the investing process.

Stock Market VS Peer-to-Peer Lending Investments – Who Wins?

stock market p2p

To buy stock, or not to buy stock that is the question! With recent markets in a volatile state you might want to look for an alternative.

Anyone who is an active stock market investor knows that it takes time to do your research (and a bit of guess work) to figure out where the market(s) are heading.

However, if you’re looking for something that’s less time consuming and slightly more effective – P2P might be for you. There are many platforms out there that are free to pick through the loans that are listed by prospective borrowers and read their stories and explanations of why they need a loan for and what they’ll do with it.

You should review the prospectus of your chosen P2P lending platform before investing as well as spreading the risk of your investment.

With any investment there is always risk involved, however, many view P2P is an alternative, especially with the current volatility of the markets. Anyone looking to diversify their investment and move away from traditional investment options might want to go down the P2P route.

Interested in P2P? If so, why not take a look at our P2P page where you can view investments and order a free information pack.

Brexit Vote Scares Investors Away From Traditional Asset Classes

Brexit P2P

New research suggests that the UK’s Brexit vote is putting investors off traditional asset classes.

Research revealed that 13 per cent of active investors said they have steered clear of currency markets since the EU vote back in late June, in addition, 10 per cent have avoided government bonds and nine per cent have u-turned from investing in equities.

Leicestershire based P2P lender ThinCats told City A.M. that 30 per cent of investors – from a survey of 2,000, including 500 defined as active investors have been put off traditional asset classes.

However, the research showed that assets such as gold has become more attractive, 14 per cent of investors stated that they have turned to the commodity as an alternative. Moreover, 7 per cent, said they view P2P as more attractive after the Brexit vote.

What P2P and Marketplace lending Industry Needs To Do To Go Mainstream

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A lack of transparency is one of the key obstacles for p2p and marketplace lending platforms experiencing considerable growth in scale, according to ThinCats’ John Mould, who believes there are several other hurdles the industry needs to overcome to fit into the mainstream investment universe. (Altfi, September 2016)

It’s fair to say that 2016 has been a challenging year for the industry which has seen high profile scandals as well as seeing slow growth.

ThinCats’ CEO told Altfi that he believes the broader industry should deal with several issues centring on greater transparency in returns, what investors are exposed to and securitisation. Mr. Mould says that many platforms are really asset management firms in disguise and should therefore be regulated as such.

Areas where Mould stresses investors and borrowers need greater transparency is in provision funds, collective pools of cash liquidity that act as a type of insurance for investors.

In the Altfi article he also questions the lack of clarity that is linked to retail and institutional investors. He stresses that the issue is that we are not quite sure how they are both treated fairly. We know in a fund that they all come at the same unit price, he mentions, but he questions on who makes the decision process on the loans?

He again questions the lack of clarity in the last paragraph of the article : “If you’re the regulator you’re saying half of them look like fund managers, half of them look like banks but worse and half of them have these provision funds that we don’t know how they work and half of them just seem to be securitising debt. How does that work?”.

 

 

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